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AN INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT YEAST SPECIES ON WINE AROMA COMPOSITION


Jeromel, Ana; Jagatić Korenika, Ana-Marija; Tomaz Ivana
AN INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT YEAST SPECIES ON WINE AROMA COMPOSITION // FERMENTED BEVERAGES / GRUMEZESCU, ALEXANDRU MIHAI ; HOLBAN, ALINA MARIA (ur.).
Duxford: Elsevier, 2019. str. 171-285 doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-815271-3.00006-3


Naslov
AN INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT YEAST SPECIES ON WINE AROMA COMPOSITION

Autori
Jeromel, Ana ; Jagatić Korenika, Ana-Marija ; Tomaz Ivana

Vrsta, podvrsta i kategorija rada
Poglavlja u knjigama, pregledni

Knjiga
FERMENTED BEVERAGES

Urednik/ci
GRUMEZESCU, ALEXANDRU MIHAI ; HOLBAN, ALINA MARIA

Izdavač
Elsevier

Grad
Duxford

Godina
2019

Raspon stranica
171-285

ISBN
978-0-12-815271-3

Ključne riječi
Yeast, aroma, wine

Sažetak
Wine, with more than 6000 years old background, is one of the world’s oldest fermentation beverage. Traditionally speaking, wine fermentation is a natural, spontaneous process carried out by indigenous yeasts mainly present in grapes. But wine fermentation is also a unique microbiological process, crucial for final wine chemical composition and quality, strongly influenced by fermentation conditions and yeast species used. Wine is a complex mixture of different classes of compounds present in a wide range of concentrations. Till date over 1300 chemical compounds have been identified in wine ; most of which are present as a result of the yeast metabolism during fermentation (Ebeler, 2001). Researchers related the interactions between yeast and grape chemical compounds have revealed an essential role of yeast contributing to the appearance, aroma, flavor, and structure of the wine. According to Fleet (2003), yeast influences wine aroma in several ways among them the most important is the alcoholic fermentation of the grape juice, de novo biosynthesis of aroma compounds, and transformation of flavor-neutral grape compounds into active once. Also among them, fermentation-derivated volatiles including esters, higher alcohols, and volatile acids as well as varietal compounds such as thiols and terpenes are the most abundant in total aroma composition of wine (Lambrechts and Pretorius, 2000). Modern winemaking has been found on the use of selected strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, due to its advantages of pure and complete fermentation coupled with good flavor characteristics as well as the high alcohol conversion rate. Today, there are numerous— perhaps hundreds of—diverse yeast strains available, and the winemaker’s choice can substantially effect the quality of the wine (Swiegers et al., 2005). Albeit S. cerevisiae is the yeast primarily responsible for alcoholic fermentation, it is not the only the yeast species found in grapes. In fact, at the time of harvest, S. cerevisiae typically accounts for 1% or less of the total yeast population found in grape berries (Barata et al., 2012). There are currently over 20 different yeast genera such as Saccharomycodes, Schizosaccharomyces, Candida, Torulaspora, Debaryomyces, Issatchenkia, Pichia, Kluyveromyces, Metschnikowia, Hanseniaspora (Kloeckera), Rhodotorula, Brettanomyces (Dekkera), and Zygosaccharomyces thought to be associated with grapes and wine (Kurtzman and Fell, 2011). Although in the past non- Saccharomyces yeasts were considered detrimental Chapter 6 An Influence of Different Yeast Species on Wine Aroma Composition 173 (or at the very least inconsequential) to the winemaking process (Dubourdieu et al., 2006 ; Bartowsky and Pretorius, 2009), nowdays many authors (Romano et al., 2003 ; Comitini et al., 2011 ; Jolly et al., 2014 ; Benito et al., 2016a) pointed out that the presence of specific non-Saccharomyces yeasts during fermentation can, under the right circumstances, contribute significantly to the definite flavor and quality of wine. So recent trends in enology have led to the commercial production and application of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking. But most non- Saccharomyces yeasts are not able to consume all sugar present in grape must and therefore need to be used as part of sequential inoculation, mixed, or multistarter cultures with S. cerevisiae strains (Azzolini et al., 2015 ; Belda et al., 2017).

Izvorni jezik
Engleski

Znanstvena područja
Poljoprivreda (agronomija)

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