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Made you look: The influence of a perceptual cue in the automatic processing of other people’s perspective


Dujmović, Marin; Valerjev, Pavle
Made you look: The influence of a perceptual cue in the automatic processing of other people’s perspective // XXI. Dani psihologije u Zadru / Nikolić, Matilda ; Tokić, Andrea ; Ćubela Adorić, Vera ; Dodaj, Arta ; Gregov, Ljiljana ; Ivanov, Lozena ; Macuka, Ivana ; Nekić, Marina ; Tucak Junaković, Ivana ; Valerjev, Pavle ; Vidaković, Marina (ur.).
Zadar: Odjel za psihologiju, Sveučilište u Zadru, 2018. str. 50-50 (predavanje, međunarodna recenzija, sažetak, znanstveni)


Naslov
Made you look: The influence of a perceptual cue in the automatic processing of other people’s perspective

Autori
Dujmović, Marin ; Valerjev, Pavle

Vrsta, podvrsta i kategorija rada
Sažeci sa skupova, sažetak, znanstveni

Izvornik
XXI. Dani psihologije u Zadru / Nikolić, Matilda ; Tokić, Andrea ; Ćubela Adorić, Vera ; Dodaj, Arta ; Gregov, Ljiljana ; Ivanov, Lozena ; Macuka, Ivana ; Nekić, Marina ; Tucak Junaković, Ivana ; Valerjev, Pavle ; Vidaković, Marina - Zadar : Odjel za psihologiju, Sveučilište u Zadru, 2018, 50-50

ISBN
978-953-331-196-8

Skup
21st Psychology Days in Zadar

Mjesto i datum
Zadar, Hrvatska, 24-26.05.2018

Vrsta sudjelovanja
Predavanje

Vrsta recenzije
Međunarodna recenzija

Ključne riječi
Heory of mind, visual attention, perspective taking, dot perspective task

Sažetak
Researchers have recently been increasingly more interested into how we process information about another person’s state of mind. The impact of processing another person’s visual perspective is a well-documented finding in this area. This has, most commonly, been investigated with the dot perspective task. Participants are cued the perspective (self or a perspective of an avatar in the scene) from which they are instructed to view stimuli, and the number of stimuli. They then decide whether the cued number of stimuli can be seen from the cued perspective. People respond slower when a different number of stimuli can be seen from one's own and the perspective of a virtual avatar (other). In these incongruent trials one’s own perspective interferes with the response about the avatar's perspective, and vice versa. This would lead to a conclusion that both perspectives are processed automatically. However, there are still unresolved questions about whether this is purely a consequence of perceptual cueing or if social information has an independent influence on the magnitude of interference. This study is one from a series implementing a version of the dot perspective task to provide further insight into these questions. The goal was to determine whether additional cues provided by the avatar influence the magnitude of interference. The experiment was a 2 (perspective) × 2 (congruence) × 2 (avatar pointing/not pointing) repeated measures design. Results from a three-way ANOVA showed participants (N=32) were significantly slower when viewing stimuli from the avatar's perspective and in incongruent trials. Additionally, the significant perspective by pointing interaction showed that participants were faster from the avatar’s perspective, but slower from their own, when the avatar was pointing. This was further qualified by a marginally significant congruence by pointing interaction effect which showed that pointing increased performance for congruent and decreased performance for incongruent trials. Clearly, the additional cue influenced the pattern of results as shown by the interaction effects. Adding perceptual cues increases the documented effects, while further studies are required to provide more insight about the relative contribution of perceptual versus social information on automatic processing of other’s perspective.

Izvorni jezik
Engleski

Znanstvena područja
Psihologija



POVEZANOST RADA


Ustanove
Sveučilište u Zadru

Autor s matičnim brojem:
Pavle Valerjev, (228360)