Napredna pretraga

Pregled bibliografske jedinice broj: 935550

Endemic warfare and scurvy in Historic period Croatia


Adamić, Anita; Bedić, Željka; Vyroubal, Vlasta; Šlaus, Mario
Endemic warfare and scurvy in Historic period Croatia // Program of the 87th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists
Austin, Texas, 2018. str. 5-5 (poster, međunarodna recenzija, sažetak, znanstveni)


Naslov
Endemic warfare and scurvy in Historic period Croatia

Autori
Adamić, Anita ; Bedić, Željka ; Vyroubal, Vlasta ; Šlaus, Mario

Vrsta, podvrsta i kategorija rada
Sažeci sa skupova, sažetak, znanstveni

Izvornik
Program of the 87th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists / - , 2018, 5-5

Skup
AAPA 2018 87th Annual Meeting

Mjesto i datum
Austin, Texas, 11.-14.04.2018

Vrsta sudjelovanja
Poster

Vrsta recenzije
Međunarodna recenzija

Ključne riječi
Scurvy ; Croatia ; Adults ; Subadults ; Warfare ; Ottomans ; Vlachs

Sažetak
From the 15th to 18th century AD the past inhabitants of Croatia were embroiled in continuous, low-intensity warfare with the Ottoman Empire making Croatian archaeological series from this period a unique resource for studying the effects that endemic warfare has on health. Here we analyze and compare the frequency and distribution of scurvy in three composite skeletal series: a pre-endemic warfare series dated from the 10th to 14th Century, an endemic warfare series from the 14th to 16th Century, and an additional Vlach series dated from the 16th to 18th Century consisting of migrant people originating from the Balkan region that were settled in Croatia by the Ottomans in return for military service. We hypothesize that by causing massive emigration, reduced mobility, closing of markets, and loss of effective labor and resource utilization, long-term endemic warfare increases metabolic stress. Scurvy was assessed separately in subadults and adults and diagnosed into three categories as: definite, probable, or possible with the aid of statistical correlation analyses according to criteria described by Geber and Murphy (2012). The resulting data support the proposed hypothesis by showing a significant increase in total scurvy frequencies (12.8% to 30.1%, P=0.00002) during the endemic warfare period with subadults being more affected than adults. The Vlach series exhibits intermediate values, significantly higher than the pre-endemic warfare series (P=0.016), but lower than the endemic series. Additionally, at the level of the complete adult sample, males were significantly more susceptible to scurvy than females (24.2% compared to 6.8%, P=0.0006).

Izvorni jezik
Engleski



POVEZANOST RADA


Ustanove
Hrvatska akademija znanosti i umjetnosti