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Croatian islands' birth cohort study – CRIBS (2015 – 2018) Maternal dietary intake during pregnancy and newborns` anthropometry at birth – the preliminary results from the CRIBS study


Missoni, Saša; Zajc Petranović, Matea; Havaš Auguštin, Dubravka; Novokmet, Natalija; Šarac, Jelena; Perinić Lewis, Ana; Pribačić Ambrožić, Vanda; Bočkor, Luka; Carić, Tonko; Dolanc, Ivan et al.
Croatian islands' birth cohort study – CRIBS (2015 – 2018) Maternal dietary intake during pregnancy and newborns` anthropometry at birth – the preliminary results from the CRIBS study // XIV International Congress of Auxology - For a healthy growth in a better world : abstracts / Lejarraga, Horacio (ur.).
Buenos Aires: International Association for the Study of Huan Growth and Clinical Auxology, 2017. str. 69-69 (predavanje, međunarodna recenzija, prosireni, znanstveni)


Naslov
Croatian islands' birth cohort study – CRIBS (2015 – 2018) Maternal dietary intake during pregnancy and newborns` anthropometry at birth – the preliminary results from the CRIBS study

Autori
Missoni, Saša ; Zajc Petranović, Matea ; Havaš Auguštin, Dubravka ; Novokmet, Natalija ; Šarac, Jelena ; Perinić Lewis, Ana ; Pribačić Ambrožić, Vanda ; Bočkor, Luka ; Carić, Tonko ; Dolanc, Ivan ; Čoklo, Miran ; Schell, Lawrence M ; Demerath, Ellen W ; Cameron, Noel

Vrsta, podvrsta i kategorija rada
Sažeci sa skupova, prosireni, znanstveni

Izvornik
XIV International Congress of Auxology - For a healthy growth in a better world : abstracts / Lejarraga, Horacio - Buenos Aires : International Association for the Study of Huan Growth and Clinical Auxology, 2017, 69-69

Skup
International Congress of Auxology - For a healthy growth in a better world (14 ; 2017)

Mjesto i datum
Buenos Aires, Argentina, 01.-03.11.2017

Vrsta sudjelovanja
Predavanje

Vrsta recenzije
Međunarodna recenzija

Ključne riječi
CRIBS study ; cohort ; pregnancy ; dietary intake in pregnancy ; newborns ; anthropometry

Sažetak
The ongoing CRoatian Islands Birth Cohort Study (CRIBS) is a national project and the first birth cohort study in the South-Eastern Europe designed to follow a representative sample of about 500 pregnant women and their children up to two years of age. The aim of the project is to assess the prevalence of risk factors (biological, environmental and behavioral) for the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) in populations from Croatian Dalmatian islands (Hvar and Brač) and mainland population (city of Split with surroundings), the Mediterranean area with very high prevalence of the MetS. So far, over 300 pregnant women and 150 of their newborns have been involved in the study. Here we present the preliminary results of testing the association of maternal diet in pregnancy with newborns` anthropometric parameters (birth weight, length and head circumference) using the data from questionnaires and obstetric records. Initially we included 131 mother – newborn pairs from the population of Split (N=71) and islands of Brač and Hvar (N=60) in this report but, since nine newborns were preterm, further analyses were performed for the remaining 122 children whose mothers filled out two questionnaires. An excessive food frequency questionnaire was filled out during the second trimester (around 32nd week of gestation) and the data on the socioeconomic status (SES) (educational level, marital status and income), lifestyle characteristics (smoking and self-estimated physical activity) and reproductive health background were collected in a different questionnaire during the first trimester of pregnancy. Information on birth weight, length, head circumference and infant sex were taken from obstetric records. Statistical analysis included the factor analysis of 20 food items with a factor loading coefficient >0.20 from validated Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), and the associations between the food items and the estimated factor scores were measured using Pearson`s correlations. We also conducted a multivariate linear regression analysis for each factor including mothers` characteristics (age, SES status – income and level of education, lifestyle characteristics - years of smoking) to assess independent associations. The estimated factor scores, age, level of physical activity, smoking and socioeconomic status were further used as independent variables in the logistic regression with the weight-at-birth, height-at-birth and head circumference-at- birth, for the lowest and the highest 15% of newborns as dependent variables. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 11.0. P values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant for all the analyses. Pregnant women were between the ages of 19.6 and 41.7 (mean age 30.54±4.37 years) and they gave birth to 69 girls and 53 boys. In comparison to newborn girls, newborn boys from the CRIBS study had significantly higher length-at-birth (51.28±1.75 cm vs. 50.48±1.77 cm, p<0.05) and head circumference-at-birth (35.41±0.90 cm vs. 34.97±1.05 cm, p<0.05). 75.8% of the pregnant women reported to be permanently employed and 54.2% of them evaluated their financial status as “average”, while only 15.9% of the seasonally employed or unemployed women self-evaluated the same financial status. Smoking in pregnancy was self-reported by 25.8% of women, although 96.8% of them said that they decreased consumption of cigarettes per day since they found out they were pregnant. Neither tobacco use nor levels of physical activity of mothers were significantly associated with body size parameters in the CRIBS newborns. Although most of the women reported having 3 main meals per day, 46.7% did not report having breakfast and 36.7% not having dinner every day. The habit of having lunch daily was reported in 90.8% of the participants. Factor analysis of 20 items from FFQ resulted in two significant factors ; the first, which explained 10.41% of the total variance, had the highest positive loadings for the consumption of blue fish (mackerel, sardine, tuna, salmon, etc), white fish (hake, John Dory, redfish, tooth fish, etc.), olive oil and fatty cheese, and the second one, which explained an additional 8.99% of the total variance, was defined by the consumption of yogurt, cereals, fish pâté and butter. Linear regression analysis of the two obtained FFQ loading factors and mothers` characteristics showed that the regression model was significant for the level of education of pregnant women and the factor 1 (p<0.05). Linear regression of the two obtained factors and newborns body size parameters showed significant correlation between the weight-at- birth and the factor 2 (p<0.05), although the regression model was not statistically significant. Logistic regression for the lowest and the highest 15% of the CRIBS newborns as dependent variables included factors 1 and 2, mothers` age at birth, level of physical activity, smoking status, level of education and employment status ; no significant regression model was found. Early-life factors (such as maternal nutrition) influence fetal programming, birth and child health outcomes later in life (1). The quality and quantity of mothers’ nutrition have an impact on obesity in offspring, as well as on the other risk factors for the MetS (2). Higher maternal protein intake (at the expense of carbohydrate or fat intake) during the second trimester of pregnancy was found to be associated with lower abdominal adiposity in neonates, but maternal overall macronutrient intake was not consistently associated with newborns anthropometric measurements (3). Studies also showed that neonatal adiposity (and not necessarily birth weight), is independently associated with increased maternal consumption of food rich with fat and carbohydrates (4). Factor analysis of food frequency questionnaire confirmed that the pregnant women from the CRIBS study mostly follow Mediterranean diet. Even though it was not statistically confirmed in our research, this type of diet might be associated with healthy pregnancy and optimal development of newborns. The limitation of this ongoing study is its still small sample size, so the final results might differ after completing the recruitment of participants. References: Barker, D.J. 2004. The developmental origins of chronic adult disease. Acta Paediatrica Supplement 93: 26-33 Yang Z and Huffman SL. 2013. Nutrition in pregnancy and early childhood and associations with obesity in developing countries. Matern Child Nutr. Suppl.1:105-19. Chong MF at al. (GUSTO Study Group). 2015. Maternal Protein Intake during Pregnancy Is Not Associated with Offspring Birth Weight in a Multiethnic Asian Population. J Nutr. 145(6):1303-10 Crume TL at al. 2016. Maternal dietary intake during pregnancy and offspring body composition: The Healthy Start Study. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 215(5):609.

Izvorni jezik
Engleski

Znanstvena područja
Biologija, Javno zdravstvo i zdravstvena zaštita, Etnologija i antropologija