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Pregled bibliografske jedinice broj: 534869

Emergence and spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius


Matanović, Krešimir; Mekić, Selma; Šeol, Branka
Emergence and spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius // Rad Hrvatske akademije znanosti i umjetnosti. Medicinske znanosti, 37 (2012), 123-135 (podatak o recenziji nije dostupan, pregledni rad, znanstveni)


Naslov
Emergence and spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

Autori
Matanović, Krešimir ; Mekić, Selma ; Šeol, Branka

Izvornik
Rad Hrvatske akademije znanosti i umjetnosti. Medicinske znanosti (1330-5301) 37 (2012); 123-135

Vrsta, podvrsta i kategorija rada
Radovi u časopisima, pregledni rad, znanstveni

Ključne riječi
Methicillin; resistance; methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius; MRSP

Sažetak
Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is the predominant coagulase-positive species in the normal flora of dogs and cats. It can be isolated from the nares, mouth, anus, groin and forehead of healthy dogs and cats. S. pseudintermedius is an opportunistic pathogen most frequently encountered in canine and feline skin and ear infections. Methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) emerged in Brazil in the late nineties. Today, two different clones dominate in the population of dogs and cats. Dominant European clone ST71 appeared in Germany in 2005 and has rapidly spread around the world, while lineage ST68 dominates in North America. Both clones are multiresistant and present one of the biggest problems of antimicrobial resistance in the veterinary medicine. Besides all beta-lactam antimicrobials, they are typically resistant to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, lincosamides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazol and in many cases to tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The treatment of MRSP infections is a new challenge in veterinary medicine because of the very limited therapeutic options. The multidrug-resistance pattern results in a potential pressure for veterinarians to use antimicrobials licensed in human medicine, such as vancomycin, mupirocin and rifampicin. This opens ethical questions because of the possible emergence of resistance to these antimicrobials. Although the zoonotic potential is much lower than for MRSA, veterinarians are at a higher risk for becoming colonized and should be aware of the zoonotic risk.

Izvorni jezik
Engleski

Znanstvena područja
Veterinarska medicina



POVEZANOST RADA


Projekt / tema
053-0481153-1129 - Mikoplazmoze i neke uvjetovane infekcijske bolesti životinja (Branka Šeol, )

Ustanove
Veterinarski fakultet, Zagreb