Napredna pretraga

Pregled bibliografske jedinice broj: 201756

Who would you notice first: a friend or a foe? The facilitated processing of threatening faces


Bubić, Andreja; Tonković, Mirjana; Maslić Seršić, Darja
Who would you notice first: a friend or a foe? The facilitated processing of threatening faces // 7th Alps-Adria Conference in Psychology, 2nd-4th June, 2005., Book of Abstracts / Manenica, Ilija (ur.).
Zadar: University of Zadar, department of Psychology, 2005. str. 188-189 (poster, međunarodna recenzija, sažetak, znanstveni)


Naslov
Who would you notice first: a friend or a foe? The facilitated processing of threatening faces

Autori
Bubić, Andreja ; Tonković, Mirjana ; Maslić Seršić, Darja

Vrsta, podvrsta i kategorija rada
Sažeci sa skupova, sažetak, znanstveni

Izvornik
7th Alps-Adria Conference in Psychology, 2nd-4th June, 2005., Book of Abstracts / Manenica, Ilija - Zadar : University of Zadar, department of Psychology, 2005, 188-189

Skup
7th Alps-Adria Conference in Psychology, 2nd-4th June, 2005

Mjesto i datum
Zadar, Hrvatska, 02-04.07.2005

Vrsta sudjelovanja
Poster

Vrsta recenzije
Međunarodna recenzija

Ključne riječi
Facial expression; emotions; visual attention
(Facial expression; emotions; visual attenti)

Sažetak
In this study we addressed the relation between emotion and attention by testing the hypothesis regarding the preferential detection of negative stimuli. We used a visual search task with a set of angry, happy and neutral faces to test whether an advantage to detect angry compared with happy faces exists. Participants searched for a discrepant (happy or angry) face in a set of otherwise identical (neutral) faces and we compared the time needed to identify the angry and happy face in a set of neutral. In the second experimental situation the participants had the same task of identifying a particular happy or angry face in a set of neutral ones, but their search was more difficult because we added additional emotional distracters discrepant to their target face. With this manipulation we tested whether angry faces were more disruptive to the participants' task of finding happy faces than vice versa. Shorter visual search for angry faces and bigger distracter effect of angry faces on the search of happy ones would indicate an advantage in processing angry faces. The results will be discussed in the context of evolutionary hypothesis according to which people are biased to successfully avoiding threat in order to survive and therefore have to be able to efficiently analyze such stimuli.

Izvorni jezik
Engleski

Znanstvena područja
Psihologija



POVEZANOST RADA


Projekt / tema
0130406
0130485

Ustanove
Filozofski fakultet, Zagreb